Root Canal Treatment

Root canals are performed on teeth that are effected by bacteria. The bacteria effects the root canals of the tooth and the procedure is carried out to eliminate the bacteria from the affected areas, prevent reinfection and save as much of the tooth as possible. The process involves removing the bacteria and pulp from the inflamed or infected tooth which is then thoroughly cleaned, disinfected, cleaned, and sealed.

Why you may need a root canal

While teeth are one of the hardest substances in your body, they have a soft core which is called the dental pulp. The pulp extends from the crown, which is the visible part of the tooth, to the root of the tooth in the jawbone. This pulp contains connective tissue, blood vessels, and nerves which can be affected by bacteria if the tooth has a cavity or is cracked. A root canal needs to be performed if this happens as otherwise, the bacteria can cause an infection or tooth abscess which eventually leads to pulp death, bone loss, and loss of the tooth itself.

How do you know if you need a root canal?

Some of the symptoms which are indicative of a person requiring a root canal include:

  • Severe pain while chewing or biting
  • Pimples on the gums
  • A chipped or cracked tooth
  • Lingering sensitivity to hot or cold, even after the sensation has been removed
  • Swollen or tender gums
  • Deep decay

Root canal treatment is designed to eliminate bacteria from the infected root canal, prevent reinfection of the tooth and save the natural tooth. When one undergoes a root canal, the inflamed or infected pulp is removed and the inside of the tooth is carefully cleaned and disinfected, then filled and sealed.

Why you may need a root canal

Teeth have a soft core called dental pulp. The pulp extends from the crown — the visible part of the tooth — to the tip of the tooth's root in the jawbone. The pulp contains nerves, blood vessels and connective tissue. When a tooth is cracked or has a deep cavity, bacteria can enter the pulp. Left untreated, bacteria and decaying material can cause a serious infection or a tooth abscess, leading to pulp death, bone loss and loss of the tooth itself.

How do you know if you need a root canal?

There are a few symptoms that mean you might need a root canal

  • Severe pain while chewing or biting
  • Pimples on the gums
  • A chipped or cracked tooth
  • Lingering sensitivity to hot or cold, even after the sensation has been removed
  • Swollen or tender gum
  • Deep decay
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